Category: CAIRNS EXPERTS

ROBOTIC SURGERY IN GYNAECOLOGY

ROBOTIC SURGERY IN GYNAECOLOGY

Dear Dr Liz, I have been told I need to have a hysterectomy. I am so scared about the recovery time and the toll it will take on my body. Have you got any advice?

If you are having a hysterectomy, planning time off work and recovery is important. Recovery means a few different things- it may mean the time to go back to work, to resume exercise or to resume sexual activity. Surgery may leave you very tired, and if you have a strenuous job, you should plan additional time off.

Recovery is influenced by surgical approach for hysterectomy. For several reasons, your gynaecologist will recommend different approaches to surgery, such as prior vaginal birth or surgery, uterine size and the need to remove the tubes or ovaries.

Vaginal approach is the least invasive, with the quickest recovery time to work. An open approach is for more complex cases usually has a recovery of 6 weeks.

Laparoscopic and robotic hysterectomy are minimally invasive techniques which aim replace open surgery with smaller cuts on the belly. They also have a speedier recovery time (approximately 2 weeks). If your surgery is combined with another operation (such as prolapse or adhesion surgery), recovery may vary. When you feel comfortable, walking is ok, with a slow increase in activity until 6 weeks. At six weeks, you will be reviewed by your gynaecologist, and can plan a return to exercise and sexual activity.

www.drelizabethjackson.com

TOP MYTHS ABOUT FINANCIAL PLANNERS

TOP MYTHS ABOUT FINANCIAL PLANNERS

Many Australians do not quite get what a financial planner does, as there is great misunderstanding out there. Here are the top myths about financial planners.

For example, many people think that financial planners can only help you if you’re wealthy. However, the benefit of seeing a financial planner is really for everybody.

Whether you are a teenager starting out, or you are 65 with a little bit of money in superannuation and wanting to retire – seeing a financial planner can provide a great benefit for you.

Most people want to understand something tangible, like ‘what they will get’ if they see a planner. This may include what services or what products they get, but the products are really just a small element.

Why it’s essential

When meeting a financial planner, getting an understanding of why they are doing what they are doing, is essential.

For instance, I am a financial planner and run a growing business. I have been doing this for 25 years and have looked after all types of clients in all types of financial situations. I have clients that are just starting out, clients in financial difficulty and quite wealthy clients that just want someone else to manage their affairs.

The real glow I get is when I see a client’s attitude towards money changes. Also when their stress goes away and they no longer lie awake at night worried about their finances. It’s rewarding when they can actually see that they can retire with a future that has clarity. Another great one is when a young family walk away knowing they have a direction and financial security.

These are the reasons I do what I do, as I know that we reduce anxiety and we allow people to enjoy their life rather than stress about money.

Here is a way to explain, from a tangible side, what financial planners can do for you:

  • look over your Superannuation and advise on how to get the most out it of it
  • advice on personal insurance – like life disability and income protection
  • help educate, inform and direct you with wealth creation
  • guidance with investing in shares
  • manage the risks and returns when investing

Making the decision to use a financial planner is a big one. You’re basically asking an individual to ‘help secure and look after your financial future’ – which takes trust.

Trust in the financial planning industry over the last 10 or so years has hit rock bottom.

Quite frankly, broadly speaking, the financial planning industry has failed many Australians. It is always that small percentage of people in any industry that can ruin a reputation. The facts are out and Australians are less trusting in financial planners.

It’s a real shame since there is such a need out there to provide strong prudent financial advice and guidance. Not only 95% of financial planners will offer this and provide diligently.

So how will the average Australian know who to trust and who will suit them?

Unfortunately, it’s a matter of interviewing them and perhaps getting referrals from your family and friends.

www.kellywealth.com.au

5 WAYS TO GET YOUR MONEY IN ORDER

5 WAYS TO GET YOUR MONEY IN ORDER

Budgeting seems like a dirty word. Especially to people who can’t bear the thought of trolling through bank statements to understand where their money has gone. Not to mention setting targets and then actually sticking to them. What are some ways to get your money in order?

Fortunately technology is now taking much of the tedious work out of knowing the detail of your spending habits.  There are now apps which can automatically track your expenditure. They use internet banking and compare those expenses against what you want to spend.

Why is knowing what your expenses and income are important?

Whether you are a family or a business, if you want to achieve your full financial potential, you need to set some goals. Track your progress towards those goals and then reward yourself once they have been achieved. Goals could be taking that family holiday to Disney Land, reducing the mortgage or purchasing an investment property.  Regardless of what the goal is, understanding what you spend and how much you can save is integral in achieving your financial and personal goals.

Show me the Money is a new service offered by Kelly Wealth Services. It can help our clients with the assistance of market leading technology to provide easy to use cash flow tools in a cost effective manner.

www.kellywealth.com.au

FINANCIAL CHECKS BEFORE HAVING A BABY

FINANCIAL CHECKS BEFORE HAVING A BABY

You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to guess that having a baby is going to make some changes to your finances. However, there are some really sneaky ones that you probably aren’t aware of that you need to be. So let’s chat about the top three financial checks before having a baby.

Tell Me Brent, what impact does having a baby have on

  1. Insurance
  2. Superannuation
  3. Ability to lend

If you are not where you want to be financially, you need a financial coach to help you get there. Do your future a favour, and book a no obligation free chat with the team at Kelly Wealth to find out how they can help you today.

The Big Decisions:

  •  How are we going to survive on one income or a reduced Income?  (Budgeting / cash flow management).
  • What one off expenses do we need to budget for?   (Cots, change tables, clothes, car seats , porta cots, Prams ) They all add up.
  • Home modifications??   Do we need more room or a bigger house.
  • Upgrade the car (My partners two door 4X4 is not a “family vehicle” or the small car will no longer meet our needs.)

Other Important considerations:

  •  Income support services.  (Paid Maternity & Paternity leave arrangements & Support, Family Tax Benefits part A & B).
  • Personal Insurances.  (Now that I am a grown up you need to consider Life insurances & income protection to protect your family).
  • Also need to consider Estate planning.  Who receives the benefits of estate if you pass away and who do you want to look after  money for the benefit of child and more importantly who would you want to look after the child in the event of parents passing away.
  • Starting a saving or investment plan for the child’s education in the future.

How can Kelly Wealth Services Assist:

  •  We provide budgeting and cash flow advice.
  • We can provide a review of your Mortgage and other loans.
  • Lainie can provide finance if you need to upgrade the house or vehicle.
  • We provide personal insurance advice.  (How much do I need? Do you have cover inside your super already?  Is it a good quality cover?)
  • We can provide investment advice on saving for children’s future needs.

www.kellyhealth.com.au

A GUIDE TO PREPARATION FOR SEPARATION

A GUIDE TO PREPARATION FOR SEPARATION

If you are still able to communicate amicably, we recommend you make a list of joint expenses and work out how much needs to be paid into an account per week, fortnight etc. to pay those expenses as they fall due. It’s Ok to keep a joint account open for that purpose if you trust each other not to misuse it. 

Work out how much you can each afford to contribute to that account based on your income and other expenses not covered by the joint list.

Otherwise…

Bank accounts

  • Bank accounts – Open a bank account in your name only and get your wages and Centrelink benefits paid into this account.
  • Joint accounts – talk to the other person about closing off joint bank accounts and dividing the amounts in there. Failing that ask the bank to freeze the account or make it so that both signatures are requires.
  • Credit cards – If the credit card is in your partner’s name can you stop using it? If it is in your name and he/she has a card – consider cancelling it.
  • Joint credit cards – consider cancelling or freezing the account
  • PIN and password – change all PIN’s and passwords.

Please note – we always encourage you to talk to your ex about these steps before taking them.

Your mortgage and other debt

  • Know what the mortgage and bills are – how much, when payable.
  • Know what the loans are. What are you liable for? Don’t forget guarantees.
  • Let the lender know you have separated, keep in contact if you are having trouble making repayments.  Can you pay the minimum repayment? Can you renegotiate the loan?
  • Don’t forget that if a debt is in joint names, the only way to ensure you are no longer liable for the loan is to remove yourself from it. Even a court order stating that the other person is totally liable for a loan, doesn’t remove your liability. Only the lender can do that.
  • Mortgages – do you have a redraw option? How can you stop the other person using the redraw? Eg – joint signatures for any withdrawals.
  • Bills – The person staying in the home should put all utility bills (phone, internet, electricity, gas) in their name only – the person moving out, should have their name taken off. You should get a balance as at the date of separation.
  • Another tip about a mortgage – if you want to keep the house you will have to take over any mortgage in joint names into your sole name. You must keep up repayments without falling into arrears and if you fear you might, talk to your bank or other lender.
  • Go and see a broker to make sure you will actually be able to take over the loan before you start any negotiations; also to make sure you really can afford to make repayments
  • Go and see a financial advisor/financial counsellor if you are struggling

The house

  • Know how it is owned – joint names or not?
  • If it is on the other person’s sole name – you may need to protect the property with a caveat.
  • If rented – can you change the lease to your sole name? Or have your name taken off?

Superannuation

  • Superannuation is an asset capable of being divided between couple after separation.
  • If you are paying extra into your super, you may consider stopping the payments for now.
  • Check who your beneficiary is on your super
  • Get a statement as at separation, but just be aware if the matter goes to court you will need to provide current balances.
  • If you can’t get the other person’s super statement from them, you can request it direct from their super trustee – it’s called a “Form 6 Request for information” and will be available on the family court website or the super trustee’s website.
  • If you are worried the other person may be able to access their super, get legal advice about applying for a “flag” ( stopping the other person being able to draw down their super)
  • For a self managed super fund – are you protected? Don’t forget that you can’t have a SMSF with only one person so it will have to be wound up which may involve selling assets

Companies and other financial entities

  • Do you know how assets are owned – i.e. by a company or family Trust? 
  • Get the relevant paperwork – e.g. get the trust deed, you need to know who the settlor and beneficiaries are
  • If unsure about a company, do an ASIC search. You need to know who the directors are and how shares are held
  • Don’t forget that to separate the interests in a company, you need to take further steps to have directors removed
  • Make sure you know about any company liabilities – tax, personal guarantees

Other assets

  • Start getting ready – what other things do you own and what are they worth?
  • Who owns them?
  • What do you owe?
  • How easily can you access these assets – ie a term deposit

See our fact sheet – Property preparation  – on our website.

This is a handy online tool:

https://www.moneysmart.gov.au/tools-and-resources/calculators-and-apps/asset-stocktake-calculator

Other stuff

  • Will – Update your will as being separated does not cancel your existing will. Divorce may invalidate it.
  • Life insurance – review the level of cover, are the named beneficiaries still correct?.
  • Super – are the named beneficiaries still correct ?
  • Power of attorney / Advance Plan – if you have something in place is it still what you want?
  • Get copies of all important documents

www.collierlawyers.com.au

HOW TO: 5 STEPS TO SEPARATION

HOW TO: 5 STEPS TO SEPARATION

If you are still able to communicate amicably, we recommend you make a list of joint expenses and work out how much needs to be paid into an account per week, fortnight etc. to pay those expenses as they fall due. It’s Ok to keep a joint account open for that purpose if you trust each other not to misuse it. 

Work out how much you can each afford to contribute to that account based on your income and other expenses not covered by the joint list.

Otherwise…

Bank accounts

  • Bank accounts – Open a bank account in your name only and get your wages and Centrelink benefits paid into this account.
  • Joint accounts – talk to the other person about closing off joint bank accounts and dividing the amounts in there. Failing that ask the bank to freeze the account or make it so that both signatures are requires.
  • Credit cards – If the credit card is in your partner’s name can you stop using it? If it is in your name and he/she has a card – consider cancelling it.
  • Joint credit cards – consider cancelling or freezing the account
  • PIN and password – change all PIN’s and passwords.

Please note – we always encourage you to talk to your ex about these steps before taking them.

Your mortgage and other debt

  • Know what the mortgage and bills are – how much, when payable.
  • Know what the loans are. What are you liable for? Don’t forget guarantees.
  • Let the lender know you have separated, keep in contact if you are having trouble making repayments.  Can you pay the minimum repayment? Can you renegotiate the loan?
  • Don’t forget that if a debt is in joint names, the only way to ensure you are no longer liable for the loan is to remove yourself from it. Even a court order stating that the other person is totally liable for a loan, doesn’t remove your liability. Only the lender can do that.
  • Mortgages – do you have a redraw option? How can you stop the other person using the redraw? Eg – joint signatures for any withdrawals.
  • Bills – The person staying in the home should put all utility bills (phone, internet, electricity, gas) in their name only – the person moving out, should have their name taken off. You should get a balance as at the date of separation.
  • Another tip about a mortgage – if you want to keep the house you will have to take over any mortgage in joint names into your sole name. You must keep up repayments without falling into arrears and if you fear you might, talk to your bank or other lender.
  • Go and see a broker to make sure you will actually be able to take over the loan before you start any negotiations; also to make sure you really can afford to make repayments
  • Go and see a financial advisor/financial counsellor if you are struggling

The house

  • Know how it is owned – joint names or not?
  • If it is on the other person’s sole name – you may need to protect the property with a caveat.
  • If rented – can you change the lease to your sole name? Or have your name taken off?

Superannuation

  • Superannuation is an asset capable of being divided between couple after separation.
  • If you are paying extra into your super, you may consider stopping the payments for now.
  • Check who your beneficiary is on your super
  • Get a statement as at separation, but just be aware if the matter goes to court you will need to provide current balances.
  • If you can’t get the other person’s super statement from them, you can request it direct from their super trustee – it’s called a “Form 6 Request for information” and will be available on the family court website or the super trustee’s website.
  • If you are worried the other person may be able to access their super, get legal advice about applying for a “flag” ( stopping the other person being able to draw down their super)
  • For a self managed super fund – are you protected? Don’t forget that you can’t have a SMSF with only one person so it will have to be wound up which may involve selling assets

Companies and other financial entities

  • Do you know how assets are owned – i.e. by a company or family Trust? 
  • Get the relevant paperwork – e.g. get the trust deed, you need to know who the settlor and beneficiaries are
  • If unsure about a company, do an ASIC search. You need to know who the directors are and how shares are held
  • Don’t forget that to separate the interests in a company, you need to take further steps to have directors removed
  • Make sure you know about any company liabilities – tax, personal guarantees

Other assets

  • Start getting ready – what other things do you own and what are they worth?
  • Who owns them?
  • What do you owe?
  • How easily can you access these assets – ie a term deposit

See our fact sheet – Property preparation  – on our website.

This is a handy online tool:

https://www.moneysmart.gov.au/tools-and-resources/calculators-and-apps/asset-stocktake-calculator

Other stuff

  • Will – Update your will as being separated does not cancel your existing will. Divorce may invalidate it.
  • Life insurance – review the level of cover, are the named beneficiaries still correct?.
  • Super – are the named beneficiaries still correct ?
  • Power of attorney / Advance Plan – if you have something in place is it still what you want?
  • Get copies of all important documents

www.collierlawyers.com.au